23 February 2014

Relativity

Female Pea hen at Middleton Plantation, SC, photo by Margaret Bedner
from her prompt at Imaginary Garden with Real Toads.


Lust found her walking in the garden as
She did every day at half past dinner.

He waited until she strayed from her friends
To peck and swallow bugs and cluck alone.

His plumage blossomed in front of her and
Then he turned to show how he was shaking.

Call me Hades he whispered and I will
Call you Persephone.  Let me touch you—
O, please don’t call your mother!  
And he pounced.

In a matter of seconds, they were gone
About their business, no longer shaking
But stepping and walking, slower, taller.

Watching from a second story window
I shrieked RAPE!  a second too late and wept.

But she glanced back at his beauty as if
his ambush suited her, he was welcome.

Love became her strut and singing gladness
as she tasted bounty in the garden.



Male Indian Peacock on display.
The elongated upper tail coverts make up the 
train of the Indian peacock.


Written for Margaret's Play It Again, Toads #2  a Imaginary Garden with  Real Toads for which I chose to redo Fireblossom's  "Lights, Camera, Love!" which is HERERe-posted for
Poets United Poetry Pantry #193.
Copyright © 2014  S.L.Chast




19 comments:

Isadora Gruye said...

Hiya Susan....I enjoyed your choice of narrators here and dancing of the birds in their common place ceremony. I found it intriguing that you put the "observer" in this poem to label the act as rape. Though, on the first reading, that part seemed out of place and took me from the satire and dance of the birds, upon a second reading, I picked up on the commentary you were layering into the piece. Not everything can been seen through the lense of understanding which we have. thanks for sharing!!! and viva la

Björn said...

What a story.. could be a fable almost.. it's not always what it seems...

Brian Miller said...

its all perception eh? and as bystanders or observers what we see may not be what we think...
something important to keep in mind...in life.

Grace said...

What to you is Rape looks differently to hen - pleasing strut & welcoming ambush ~ The ways of the birds (& animals) are different from us & from your title, relative depends a lot from where one is ~

Enjoyed this one Susan ~ Happy Sunday ~

Sherry Blue Sky said...

Oh, now THIS kind of love story I can totally get behind, cackle......love it!

Sumana Roy said...

Yeah...Relativity is perfect....

Kerry O'Connor said...

But she glanced back at his beauty as if
his ambush suited her...

These are such telling lines, and relate to both the world of birds and men. The convolutions of attraction are often times fathomless.

Helen said...

Love, love this!

grapeling said...

all strut and cackle until the pounce. I like the shifting narrator, how you show different perspectives ~

Hannah said...

Titled well...I enjoy all of the perspectives you brought to this piece, Susan!

Mary said...

Ha, it seems one cannot always judge by what one sees. It is how the other feels that counts! (Oh, and aren't peacocks beautiful birds?)

Laurie Kolp said...

This made me smile, Susan. = )

Robert Bourne said...

wonderful take on theme Susan... using the birds was brilliant...

madhumakhi said...

Relativity is an apt title. Forced and wanton copulation in humans is rape while it's often the normal in many other species.

Sherry Blue Sky said...

Seems like love is straightforward amongst the peacocks, at least. Cackle. I loved the observer's horror, made me smile.

Claudia said...

ha - relativity for sure - things don't always seem what they look like on first glance... a lesson to learn..

Gabriella said...

Very unexpected ending, Susan! I wonder whether this is really what takes place between birds.

R.K. Garon said...

Awesome! A well written piece. Bravo Susan!
ZQ

PT said...

What a wonderful imagination....