13 June 2015

Nightingale Song

NSRW Nightingale.png
source


I, sadly, haven't heard nightingale song
but as I live and breathe both spirit and
mortality, I may hear it through odes
like Keats’—and fear it there, too, as it rings
out over death and departures so well.

Keats himself felt the song lure him into
darkness near death, knew desire and despair
before bidding the song adieu, not yet
ready to ride the waves into beyond.

That beauty is otherworldly is true,
but can it not be earthly too?  Our earth
is part of God, and must we leave it just
when tuned to heavenly music pleasing
to our dear souls, relieving our sore wings?



Posted at  Poets United 

Poetry Pantry #256


Copyright © 2015  S.L.Chast




28 comments:

Sumana Roy said...

"That beauty is otherworldly is true, / but can it not be earthly too?..." hope it is and relieves our sore wings too...you Were inspired Susan..a lovely and thoughtful write...

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

I was going to say that even though I have never hard a nightingale either, I can't believe it is better than the carolling of the magpie — then I realised you would not have heard the Australian magpie either (which is a different bird from magpies of the northern hemisphere).

Yes, Keats was a bit morbid!

Myra said...

Such a sad, haunting poem, Susan.

Sherry Blue Sky said...

I love that beauty is both worldly and otherworldly.....and the music pleasing our souls and relieving our sore wings. Fantastic write! Wowzers, kiddo! My soul takes flight.......

Mary said...

This is a lovely poem, Susan. Perhaps inspired by Rosemary's article this week? I like especially the thought of breathing both spirit and mortality. I think we each have a 'foot' in both places, in this world and the next.

totomai said...

Nightingale song could be a sort of omen then. In poetry, lots of times that nightingale song has been used. Wondered though but if anyone had heard it. Or better if it will be remain unheard.

But it can be twisted - turn it to good omen to nourish our souls. Have a great Sunday, Susan

Old Egg said...

The beauty of the nightingales song is only truly understood by those that really love the world.

brudberg said...

We have a nightingale singing close to where we live, and primarily it's amazingly strong. It can be heard all over the neighborhood, and it is actually quite melodramatic... So your beautiful poem make perfect sense to me,

kaykuala said...

The second stanza tells it all. It accounts for the feeling of despair that brings realism into your poetry. Obviously Keats was just as human as one would have expected. Well penned Susan!

Hank

Jae Rose said...

A wonderfully honest and thoughtful poem..beauty is hard to pin down..perhaps because we make it seem otherworldly it becomes desirable something to aspire to..perhaps like Keats though when it is 'there' we may wish it were still an idea..i hope you hear many birds singing today..

Sanaa Rizvi said...

This is such a wonderful and inspiring poem Susan. I adored these lines :D

Our earth
is part of God, and must we leave it just
when tuned to heavenly music pleasing
to our dear souls, relieving our sore wings?

Beautifully penned :D

Lots of love,
Sanaa

Brother Ollie said...

amen - well crafted Susan!

Grace said...

I would love to hear the nightingale song, smiles ~ Admiring the cadence in your verses Susan ~

Dr. Pearl Ketover Prilik (PKP) said...

Beautiful poem that sings ....

Gillena Cox said...

The poet stores for us.. Who has not heard the nightingale. And we nourish ours souls with his poetry. But my dawn birds present a reality and a hope that thrills my being

Thanks for your provokative shating today Susan

Much love...

Kerry O'Connor said...

I too have only ever imagined the nightingale's song - it has iconic status, and rather more intellectual meaning than I'm sure the little bird could ever have guessed.

R.K. Garon said...

I agree w/ Pearl... beautiful.
ZQ

Moonie said...

But there is a somber beauty
one that only can be had
as a life enters a journey
to another world so vast
where a song so lovely beckons
unique unearthly is the sound

"welcome" laps against new moorings

here and safe are you at last


Yes Susan, you do inspire with such a thought provoking song...

Donna@LivingFromHappiness said...

'must we leave it just
when tuned to heavenly music pleasing
to our dear souls, relieving our sore wings?'

Beautiful..I concur!

kelvin s.m. said...

Such an antriguing creature, Susan. I have never seen nor heard a Nightingale before, and like you, I can only make an impression of it from poems like Keats', etc. I once wrote a poem about a Nightingale before where I associate her song to have brought back the Old World romances. Thanks for the poem!

G L Meisner said...

Great poem, love the reference to Keats' death obsession.

Torie said...

Such a beautiful write, Susan. I loved 'as I live and breath both spirit and mortality' and 'Our earth is part of God'. I believe that :)

Truedessa said...

Susan, your poetry is always layered with interesting messages.I too would like to hear that song as I think it would bring peace and renewal.

humbird said...

I believe everything you happen to see at this earth experience - a beauty...many poems/songs in ukrainian/russian culture dedicated to nightingale....they always are like catalyst/contrast facilitator to reality surrounded us....now the birds/animals trying to contact us, people about new times/vibrations just to call to stay in present, be true to our loving human nature...your poem sounds indeed as a song...

Rose Ketring said...

I've never heard a nightingale sing before..what is the symbolism between this bird and death? I like how you lead me back to the stability of the Earth at the very end.

Claire said...

How much we have experienced through poetry! It starts to feel like our own experience...

Kim Nelson said...

... must we leave it just ... You've captured the human experience in these three stanzas, Susan.

Wendy Bourke said...

Wonderful! The last stanza of the poem is inspired.

“That beauty is otherworldly is true, but can it not be earthly too?”

subtly echoes the ethereal close in Ode to a Nightingdale by Keats:

“Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Fled is that music:—Do I wake or sleep?”

A lovely, thoughtfully rendered contemplation of “beauty”.