22 June 2022

Snow Globes for Climate Action

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBp1Q_bHe0Y

What if we made snow globes instead of poems?
What if we made glass paperweights at home?

We’d show cities and woods as they once were
before fires and floods began to occur.
And each bubble would be a tiny ark
holding inhabitants, even skylarks.
You’d see each scene on-site through air-proof domes,
some in glass, some in tear-filled catacombs.

These shows would spread, would be open to view,
while performers recalled life’s sounds for you.
(A built-in benefit would be their weight
to hold down safely what fierce winds might take.)

Get ready! As seas rise and coasts erode
we can preserve what’s there in a snowglobe.


I've been thinking of forms of protest that might work, like road signs reminding people of what used to be--but ahead of time--as if satire could provoke action that truth saying does not.  Are we speaking of a commons?  Only under the domes and in us creators/spectators.


My blog poems are rough drafts.
Please respect my copyright.
© 2022 Susan L. Chast


5 comments:

Rajani said...

It might be how we will end up- climate controlled domes to protect whoever or whatever is left.. today's reality a quickly fading memory... Scary!

Sherry Blue Sky said...

My fear is that one day parents will take their kids to a museum to see a replica of what an old growth tree used to look like. I love the original viewpoint in this poem. So well done.

Tzvi Fievel said...

especially liked, "a tiny ark holding inhabitants." Overall, a very inventive poem.

Brendan said...

A snow globe says, behold this. And we peer, and shake, and peer. Which is essentially the poem, its poetry of insight and remembrance, "some in glass, some in tear-filled catacombs." And is weighty enough to withstand these present winds and storm. Weighty enough to feel like a heavy heart. Amen.

Kerfe said...

If only the people that need to open their eyes understood satire...but I fear not.

Let us hope we are not reduced to those tiny worlds as a reminder of what we've lost.